E-mail icon E-mail courses Print icon Print course(s)
 

as of 6/30/2022

WHAT IS A CLASSIC? THE LITERARY CANON CONTESTED
Country - Partner Institution - Programs: Netherlands - University College, Utrecht - 'Univ. College Utrecht'
UC Course SubjectEnglish
Comparative Literature
Number & Suffix: 104
Full UC Title: WHAT IS A CLASSIC? THE LITERARY CANON CONTESTED 
Transcript Title: LITERARY CANON 
UC QTR Units - Division: 6.0 - Upper Division 
Course Description: This course explores a key question in literary studies: “What is a classic?” It examines how influential literary critics and writers (e.g., Calvino, Coetzee, Eliot, Horace, Petrarch) addressed the problem at different historical moments and evaluates what can be learned about the values attached to literature and the frameworks through which literature is seen. In examining texts from antiquity, the Renaissance, and the modern period, students consider the difference between a “classic” and the “canon” and study the conflicts and histories of both canon-formation and canon-contestation. Students also consider the question of literary fame and celebrity, examining institutions that contribute to certain texts becoming successful, while others disappear. The course takes into account a set of exemplary literary and critical debates and applies conceptual tools such as intertextuality and post-colonial criticism to questions of canonicity. Here, students discuss how literature is studied and appreciated (scholarly and publicly) according to a set of historically formed and shifting values. Genre also occupies an important place in discussions, as students assess how different forms of writing – including poetry, correspondence, essay, novel, novella, graphic memoir, and film – are differently received. Another important dimension of the course is how texts travel through space and time and are reappropriated in different settings and periods through rewriting and adaptation (e.g., Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Kafka’s The Metamorphosis). In this way, one of the crucial literary and critical practices that contribute to canonization and periodization is translation and global distribution – the translation and travel of texts beyond their immediate context and their appreciation, citation, and appropriation in other settings. Prerequisites include at least one course on literature. 
Language of Instruction: English
 
Partner Title: WHAT IS A CLASSIC? THE LITERARY CANON CONTESTED 
Partner University Department: Humanities 
Partner University Course Number: UCHUMLIT26