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as of 10/5/2022

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE LAW
Country - Partner Institution - Programs: United Kingdom - England - London School of Economics - 'London School of Economics'
UC Course SubjectLegal Studies
Number & Suffix: 154 Y
Full UC Title: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE LAW 
Transcript Title: INFO TECH & THE LAW 
UC QTR Units - Division: 12.0 - Upper Division 
Course Description: In this survey course, students assess a selection of fundamental legal issues in the field of Information Technology (IT) Law. The course begins by introducing students to key debates in IT and internet governance: do we need distinct legal rules to regulate IT? Who does, and should, control the internet? Should the internet be a "neutral" network? Once students are equipped with this knowledge of internet governance and the challenges this poses for the law, they consider how the law has responded to the challenges of IT and the extent to which legal issues have shaped the development of information society policy. This is done through a detailed examination of topics such as online data protection, computer misuse and hacking, freedom of expression and the protection of intellectual property. The focus is initially on English law, although the global nature of IT law means that there are already strong EU and US legal influences upon the English system. Therefore, comparative aspects are introduced in places, and readings include materials drawn from, among others, US law journals. This course does not require an in-depth understanding of contemporary computer technology – we are primarily interested in the legal implications of the use of IT, and the intended and unintended consequences of regulating that use. The focus will be initially on English law, although the global nature of IT law means that there are already strong EU and US legal influences upon the English system. Therefore, comparative aspects will be introduced in places, and readings will include materials drawn from, among others, US law journals. This course does not require an in-depth understanding of contemporary computer technology – we are primarily interested in the legal implications of the use of IT, and the intended and unintended consequences of regulating that use. 
Language of Instruction: English
 
Partner Title: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE LAW 
Partner University Department: Law 
Partner University Course Number: LL210